US Small Currency

In 1929, all currency was changed to the size which is familiar today. The first one-dollar bills were issued as silver certificates under Series of 1928. The treasury seal and serial numbers were dark blue. The obverse was nearly identical to the Series of 1923 $1 silver certificate, but the treasury seal featured spikes around it and a large gray one replaced the blue "1 DOLLAR." The reverse, too, had the same border design as the Series of 1923 $1 bill, but the center featured a large ornate one superimposed by one dollar. These are commonly known as "Funnybacks" due to the rather odd-looking "ONE" on the reverse. These $1 silver certificates were issued until 1934.

In 1933, Series of 1928 $1 United States Notes were issued to supplement the supply of $1 Silver Certificates. Its treasury seal and serial numbers were red and there was different wording on the obverse of the note. However, a month after their production, it was realized that there would be no real need for these notes and production was stopped. A small number of these $1 bills entered circulation and the rest were kept in treasury vaults until 1949 when they were issued in Puerto Rico.

In 1934, the design of the $1 silver certificate was changed. This occurred with that year's passage of the Silver Purchase Act, which led to a large increase in dollar bills backed by that metal. Under Washington's portrait, one silver dollar was changed to one dollar. The treasury seal was moved to the right and superimposed over one, and a blue numeral 1 was added to the left. The reverse remained the same.

A year later, in 1935, the design of the one-dollar bill was changed again. On the obverse, the blue numeral 1 was changed to gray and made smaller, the gray one to the right was removed, the treasury seal was made smaller and superimposed by washington d.c., and a stylized one dollar was added over the treasury seal. The reverse was also changed to its current design, except for the absence of in god we trust.

The next change came in 1957 when the $1 bill became the first piece of paper U.S. currency to bear the motto in god we trust; it was added over the word one on the reverse. Initially the BEP began printing the motto on notes printed with the new 32 note press, but soon Series of 1935G bills printed on a 18 note press featured the motto.

The final production of $1 Silver Certificates occurred in late 1963. In 1964, the redemption of Silver Certificates for silver coin ended and in 1968 the redemption of Silver Certificates for silver bullion ended.

Production of one-dollar Federal Reserve Notes was undertaken in late 1963 to replace the soon-to-be obsolete $1 Silver Certificate. The design on the reverse remained the same, but the border design on the obverse underwent considerable modification, as the mostly abstract filigrees were replaced with designs that were mostly botanical in nature. In addition, the word "one," which appeared eight times around the border in small type, was eliminated. The serial numbers and treasury seal were printed in green ink. This was the first time the one-dollar bill was printed as a Federal Reserve Note.

The $1 bill became the first denomination printed at the new Western Currency Facility in February 1991, when a shipment of 3.2 million star notes from the Dallas FRB was produced.

Though bill denominations of $5 and higher have been redesigned twice since 1995 as part of ongoing anti-counterfeiting efforts, there are currently no plans to redesign the $1 or $2 bills.

TT FR 2408 1928 $1000 GOLD CERTIFICATE PMG 53 E...

  TT FR 2408 1928 $1000 GOLD CERTIFICATE PMG 53 EPQ AU REMARKABLY SCARCE         ...

  TT FR 2408 1928 $1000 GOLD CERTIFICATE PMG 53 EPQ AU REMARKABLY SCARCE         Fr. 2408 $1000 1928 Gold Certificate. Signatures of Woods and Mellon displaying serial number A00077355A. Graded 53 Exceptional Paper Quality About Uncirculated by PMG. Gold Certificates are highly collectible in any grade. Desired by numerous collectors, but very difficult to find, especially in this grade. A quick research on PMG Population Report reveals a total of only seventy-six notes certi...

$34,950.00